Courses

Manoogian Simone College of Business and Economics (CBE) Course Descriptions

BUS 050 Pre-term Quantitative Methods (Credits: 0)

This intensive workshop for incoming students is designed to refresh the basic quantitative tools essential for the successful completion of the program. The course content provides the student with a number of mathematical and statistical tools frequently used in business analysis, marketing research, operations management and finance. Topics include: linear and exponential growth, data analysis and description statistics (mean, median, mode, range, variance, deviation), basic concepts of probability, hypothesis testing, introduction to linear regression, basics of linear programming, compound interest, discounting and calculation of Net Present Value. Topics may change according to the needs of the participating students.  The main software used is Microsoft Excel. The course can be waived by placement test.
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BUS 101 Introduction to Business (Credits: 3)

Introduction to Business is a required course for first-year BAB majors. This course addresses the basic functions and activities of business both individually and collectively in the generation of jobs, the production and dissemination of needed goods, the pursuit of innovation, the creation of social and personal assets, and the satisfaction of individual and societal needs and wants. The course also examines ways that individuals can responsibly manage their own financial health and welfare as part of the larger economic system. Students will be encouraged to relate the material covered to their own life experiences and to critical national and international challenges. Home tasks will include reading, writing reports on important current issues that relate to the subject matter, and reflections on personal observations and analyses.
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Prerequisite:

 

BUS 102 Introduction to Personal Finance (Credits: 3)

This course provides a framework for understanding the basics of financial literacy.  Emphasis is placed on students becoming familiar with key components of the Armenian financial system as they relate to personal financial health.  Topics to be addressed are an understanding of money origination and its turnover, basics of investing, insurance, banking products such as loans and savings accounts, credit and debit cards, current accounts, and others.  The course will also study the major principles of different types of interest calculations and, finally, the importance of having and maintaining a good credit score.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.
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Prerequisite: 

 

BUS 105 Foundations of Management (Credits: 3)

The course provides a comprehensive introduction to principles of management.  Through the course, students will become familiar with various organizational structures and functions and will develop the analytical tools to determine how organizational resources (money, time, and personnel) can be most effectively managed.  The course will cover the following topics: organizational culture, individual and group behavior, leadership, motivation, teamwork, communication, and measures of organizational effectiveness.   Home tasks will include completion of reading assignments and analysis of case studies. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.
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Prerequisite:

 

BUS 109 Business Mathematics (Credits: 3)

This course treats standard one-variable calculus with an emphasis on business and economics applications, as well as a short introduction to multivariable calculus. It is designed for business students, who want a brief course in Calculus. Calculus topics include the derivative, methods of finding derivatives, business applications of derivatives, the integral, methods of integration, business applications of integration, and the calculus of the exponential and logarithmic functions. Multivariable calculus topics include partial derivatives and finding local extrema. Students are required to complete weekly reading assignments and solve in-class and homework problem sets. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.
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BUS 110 Applied Statistics (Credits: 3)

This course introduces the necessary core quantitative methods that will be needed in future offerings as part of the BA in Business program.  Statistical software and the use of spreadsheets are integrated throughout so that students better comprehend the importance of using modern technological tools for effective model building and decision making. The course will make use of a data oriented approach in exposing students to basic statistical methods, their conceptual underpinning, such as variability and uncertainty, and their use in the real world. Topics include data collection, descriptive statistics, elementary probability rules and distributions, sampling distributions, and basic inference.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.
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Prerequisite:

 

BUS 112 Social, Legal & Ethical Environment of Business (Credits: 3)

This course explores the basic social, legal and ethical environment of business by examining 1) the role of business in society, 2) the interactions between businesses as well as between businesses and governments, 3) basic legal frameworks for businesses, and 4) ethical standards in business, and finally 5) corporate responsibility.  Students will apply appropriate social, legal, and ethical principles, frameworks and standards to analyze modern business scenarios. .   Students will work individually and in groups to analyze case studies.  Home tasks include reading, the writing of papers, and case study analysis.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.
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BUS 145 Introduction to Financial Accounting (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to the terminology, procedures and principles of financial accounting and reporting. Students will develop the necessary skills to 1) analyze routine business transactions and accounting information, 2) measure assets, liabilities, equities, and income, and 3) understand, analyze, and develop financial statements and other forms of financial reporting and communication..  Weekly home tasks will require students to complete weekly reading assignments and apply accounting procedures and principles in order to analyze routine business transactions and accounting information. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.
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Prerequisite:

 

BUS 146 Introduction to Managerial Accounting (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to the terminology, procedures and principles of financial accounting and reporting. Students will develop the necessary skills to 1) analyze routine business transactions and accounting information, 2) measure assets, liabilities, equities, and income, and 3) understand, analyze, and develop financial statements and other forms of financial reporting and communication..  Weekly home tasks will require students to complete weekly reading assignments and apply accounting procedures and principles in order to analyze routine business transactions and accounting information. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS145

 

BUS 160 Principles of Marketing (Credits: 3)

The course introduces students to the field of marketing and marketing management.  Students learn to analyze, plan, and implement marketing strategies in order to achieve the objectives of a range of organizations. Students analyze cases that focus on key marketing tasks: marketing research, consumer behavior, segmentation and targeting, product and brand management, sales forecasting, pricing, marketing channels, and promotion and advertising strategies. Students will also have the opportunity to work in teams to develop and present an innovative marketing plan for a business of their choice.  Home tasks will include completion of reading assignments and case study analysis as well as weekly progress on team marketing plan. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week time per week including discussions.
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BUS 177 Business Communications (Credits: 3)

This course provides an intensive introduction to the communication process, the concepts and principles of internal and external business communications, as well as develops an understanding of public relations in a business context. The course also teaches persuasive writing, public speaking, and collaborative skills necessary for future business courses, internships, and professional positions. The course involves lectures, presentations, research, group projects, discussions with active participation and case studies. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.
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Prerequisite:

 

BUS 201 Business Negotiations (Credits: 3)

This course addresses conflict resolution techniques as well as a broad range of negotiation challenges and strategies. Students will learn about the theory and application of effective negotiation.  Through this course, students will be able to analyze individual, group, and organizational behavior and develop techniques to mediate and resolve conflict. Home tasks include reading and case study analysis.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS105

 

BUS 207 Human Resources Management (Credits: 3)

This course provides an overview of contemporary issues in HRM exploring HR managers’ role in overseeing employee career development cycle from entry to exit. Topics include but are not limited to recruitment, selection and induction, training and development, compensation and benefits, performance management and appraisal systems.  Class format includes lectures followed by peer discussions progressing to student presentations and final projects. Instructor-led discussion, home assignments and case study analysis.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS105 

 

BUS 210 Introduction to International Business Management (Credits: 3)

This course examines the management of international corporations in today’s global political and economic environment. Topics include management challenges faced by multinational corporations, the economics of trade, money and investment in the world economy, policies and behavior of governments and international organizations, and current issues regarding emerging economies and shifts in the political economy of global markets. Home tasks will include reading assignments, research, and case study analysis. Three hour of instructor-led class time per week.
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BUS 211 Introduction to Innovation & Entrepreneurship (Credits: 3)

The course examines the sources of motivation for entrepreneurship and innovation, and the skills, knowledge, and abilities of entrepreneurs and the innovators.  Students will become familiar with the processes involved in starting a new venture or transforming an existing business.  Integrating their business knowledge from previous coursework, students will generate innovative business ideas and develop implementable business plans.  The course will explore the following topics: opportunity identification, feasibility of ideas, market analysis, legal and tax considerations, ownership options, and management and financing challenges and requirements.  Home tasks will include completion of reading assignments, analysis of case studies, and development of business plan. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS105  BUS145  BUS160

 

BUS 226 Money, Banking & Financial Institutions (Credits: 3)

This course examines modern theory of corporate finance and financial institutions. Topics covered include, monetary policy, financial markets, financial intermediation and the role of banks and other financial institutions, regulation of financial markets, incomplete financial contracting, financial intermediation, initial public offerings, market for corporate control and security design. Students will work collaboratively in groups to analyze financial institutions and apply relevant theories and frameworks to real-world business problems.  Students will present their findings to their peers and business professionals. Home tasks will include reading, research, and case study analysis. Three hour of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS145  BUS146  BUS230  ECON121  ECON122

 

BUS 227 International Monetary Relations (Credits: 3)

This course explores international macroeconomic relationships. Topics include national income, accounting, and balance of payments; foreign exchange rates and exchange rate markets; money, interest rates, and exchange rate determination; prices, exchange rates, and output in the short run; international monetary arrangements; fixed versus flexible exchange rates; optimal currency areas; and international capital flows. The course relates basic economic theory to current international problems, using a policy-oriented approach. Home tasks include research, reading, problem sets, and case study analysis. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: ECON121

 

BUS 230 Introduction to Finance (Credits: 3)

The course introduces students to the principles of finance and their application to financial decision making in a variety of business enterprises. The course will examine the following topics: financial analysis and the problems of financial forecasting; capital budgeting, cost of capital, and working capital management; project risk management; time value of money; securities valuation; comparing financial objectives of manager and investor; and long term financing. Home tasks will include completion of reading assignments, problem sets and case study analysis. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week time.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS109 or CS100  BUS110  BUS145 

 

BUS 232 Principles of Corporate Finance (Credits: 3)

This course builds upon topics covered in BUS 230 Introduction to Finance  and provides an overall introduction to the theory, methods, and concerns of corporate finance.  Topics include time value of money and capital budgeting, risk and return, dividend policy decisions, security market efficiency, and optimal capital structure.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS230

 

BUS 245 Intermediate Financial Accounting (Credits: 3)

This course builds upon concepts covered in BUS 145 Introduction to Financial Accounting. This course will review accounting principles and examine the components of the asset side of the balance sheet: cash, accounts receivable, inventory, marketable securities, equity investments, PPE, and intangibles.   Students are required to complete weekly reading assignments and problem sets. Home tasks will require students to apply complex accounting procedures and principles and analyze business transactions. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS145 

 

BUS 247 Intermediate Managerial Accounting (Credits: 3)

Building upon topics covered in BA 246 Intro to Managerial Accounting, this course explores alternative methods of accounting information for managerial decision making.  Students will analyze the complex relationships between accounting techniques and other organizational activities including strategy, employee motivation, and the use of accounting information to develop solutions for managerial challenges.  Home tasks will include completion of reading assignments, problem sets and case study analysis. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week time.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS146

 

BUS 248 Introduction to Financial Statement Analysis (Credits: 3)

This course examines financial reporting in the context of decision-making and contracting. Students will extract, interpret, and analyze financial statements with emphasis on identifying various objectives and incentives. Students will apply learned techniques to case studies and real-world business scenarios.  Home tasks will include case study analysis and problem sets. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS145

 

BUS 250 Tax Accounting (Credits: 3)

This course will introduce students to the Armenian tax code and the different categories of taxes applicable to individuals and companies, domestic and foreign, including profit tax, income tax, VAT, social security, property, land and other excise taxes. In addition to learning about the accounting and tax reporting requirements, students will also study elementary tax planning, taxation of basic import/export transactions including customs, and international taxation under double tax and foreign investment treaties.  Home tasks will include problem sets, statutory interpretation and application, and review of tax authority guidance and administrative cases.  Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS145

 

BUS 253 Introduction to Auditing (Credits: 3)

This course examines the changing role of the auditor, the organization of the accounting profession, and the influences of oversight.  Topics include auditing and reporting standards,audit planning and documentation, materiality and risk, internal control, statistical tools,legal liability, and professional ethics. Students will utilize journal articles and case studies to discuss and analyze theory. Home tasks include reading, case study analysis and problem sets. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS145

 

BUS 254 Intermediate Auditing (Credits: 3)

This course builds upon topics introduced in BUS253,Introduction to Auditing, and focuses on auditing financial reports, internal controls, and Electronic Data Processing (EDP) systems. Topics include the personnel and payroll system, inventory, capital acquisition cycle, selected balance sheet and income statement accounts, audit reports, assurances and other services, professional ethics, and legal responsibilities.  Also discussed will be the value value of internal auditing to a company’s strategy. Home tasks include reading, case study analysis and problem sets. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS253 

 

BUS 257 International Accounting (Credits: 3)

This course examines how generally accepted accounting principles and reporting practices have been developed and applied globally. Topics include inflation accounting and foreign currency translation, accounting for hedging transaction losses, management control in the foreign environment, analysis of foreign financial statements, transfer pricing and international taxation. Students will utilize case studies to compare practices and examine theory. Home tasks include research, case study analysis, and problem sets. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS145  ECON228

 

BUS 261 Sales Management (Credits: 3)

This course examines through case study analysis the strategic and tactical aspects of sales management with emphasis on strategies for managing a sales force. Business-to-business as well as business-to-consumer relationships will be covered. Students will engage in individual presentations as well as group projects. Topics include salesperson effectiveness, deployment, motivation, organizational design, compensation, and evaluation.   Home tasks will include reading, research, case study analysis, and presentation preparation. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS160

 

BUS 262 Consumer Behavior (Credits: 3)

This course examines the factors influencing consumer choices in the market place. Topics include consumer knowledge, rationality, judgment biases, risk-taking, dealing with conflicting values, and prospect theory.   Students will work individually and in groups to analyze case studies.  Home tasks include reading, research, and case studies. Three hour of instructor-led class time per week
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS160

 

BUS 263 Brand Management (Credits: 3)

This course examines the importance of building a brand as well as the ingredients for solid brand management. Topics include understanding brands, designing brand, and measuring brand usage.  Students will work individually and in groups to analyze case studies and present findings. Home tasks include research and case study analysis.  Three hour of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS112  BUS160

 

BUS 265 International Marketing (Credits: 3)

This course examines the economic, cultural, social, political, legal, and strategic influences on international marketing. Topics include product pricing, distribution, strategies and policies, market selection, and market research.  Home tasks include reading, research, and case study analysis.  Three hour of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS160

 

BUS 266 Advertising Management (Credits: 3)

This course examines the theories, strategies, principles and practices of effective advertising management.  Students will utilize theory and market research to analyze the design and management of advertising. Topics include consumer segmentation, target selection, consumer motivation and insight, and developing communications strategies.   Students will work individually and in groups to analyze case studies. Home tasks include research and case study analysis.  Three hour of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS112  BUS160

 

BUS 271 Tourism and Hospitality (Credits: 3)

This course will examine the scope of the hospitality and tourism industries and how they work together, whilst learning key business skills including marketing, operations management and human resources. The course will address hospitality management knowledge and practices. It will review aspects from marketing to engineering of lodging and food service industries. Home tasks will include industry analysis, reading assignments and case study write-ups. Instructor-led discussion, along with reading, written, and practical assignments.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS112  BUS160

 

BUS 275 Market Research (Credits: 3)

This course examines the role of market research in solving marketing problems.  Topics include problem formulation, research design, alternative methods of data collection, sampling, and data analysis techniques. Students will work individually and in groups to engage in market research. Home tasks include research, case study analysis, and problem sets.  Three hour of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS110  BUS112  BUS160

 

BUS 276 Integrated Marketing Communication (Credits: 3)

This course explores the integrated approach to marketing products and services and the major marketing communication decisions made by brand managers. Topics include mass media advertising, public relations, sales promotion, direct response marketing and packaging. Students will work individually and in groups on various marketing projects throughout the semester. Home tasks include research and case study analysis.  Three hour of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS112  BUS160  BUS275

 

BUS 278 Internet Marketing (Credits: 3)

This course will build upon BA 160 Principles of Marketing and investigate the opportunities and challenges presented by the continuing development of Internet Technology.  Topics include e-business strategy, online consumer behavior, strategy alternatives, advertising, promotions, and public relations. Lectures and workshops will explore the use of the internet in market research and marketing communication between businesses and consumers as well as between businesses. Home tasks will include research and case study analysis. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS160     

 

BUS 279 Special Topics in Marketing (Credits: 3)

This course explores topics in business communication with emphasis on current problems and research. Topics to be announced prior to course registration.  Three hour of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS105  BUS112   

 

BUS 280 Operations Management (Credits: 3)

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the role, responsibilities, and skill sets of operations managers.  Through this course, students will learn how operations managers can effectively and efficiently transform human, physical, financial, and technical resources into goods and services.  Students will also learn how to analyze, run and improve business operations across a range of industries. The course emphasizes operation-level decision-making, involving both process-design and resource decisions. Students are required to complete a final project in which they assess the effectiveness of management decisions and provide recommendations to a real world business challenge based upon an extensive analysis of both qualitative and quantitative data. Home tasks will include completion of reading assignments, problem sets and case study analysis. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS105  BUS109 or CS100  BUS110 

 

BUS 281 Management Information Systems (Credits: 3)

The course introduces students to information technologies as they influence the structure, processes, and strategies of organizations and economies, and as they influence the roles and techniques of management. Through this course, students will examine the role of information systems in solving business-related problems such as new product development, innovation, and competitive performance. Topics include computer-based information systems; managerial use, acquisition, and control of information systems and technology; ethical use of information; and emerging information technologies. Home tasks will include completion of reading assignments, problem sets and case study analysis. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS230     

 

BUS 285 Strategic Management (Credits: 3)

This course brings together the skills and disciplinary understanding gained in previous courses, with a focus on managerial decisions and actions that determines the long-term performance of a company. Topics include: environmental scanning (both external and internal), strategy formulation (strategic or long-range planning), strategy implementation, and evaluation and control. The study of strategic management, therefore, emphasizes the monitoring and evaluating of external opportunities and threats in light of a corporation’s strengths and weaknesses.

Students will develop skillsets for understanding and analyzing strategic issues. Students will examine and analyze cases studies covering a broad range of business situations as well as other internal and external factors affecting and driving managerial decision-making. Students will work both individually and in groups, to present cases, and develop a foreign market-entry strategy project for a virtual company they will develop themselves. There are three hours of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: ECON121  BUS105  BUS112 

 

BUS 286 Accounting Information Systems (Credits: 3)

This course examines accounting information systems, including their design, control, and use. Through this course, students will develop their abilities to understand the processing of accounting data through computerized systems and the controls that are necessary to assure accuracy and reliability of the data processed by these systems. Home tasks will include completion of reading assignments, problem sets and case study analysis. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS145     

 

BUS 287 Start-Up Management (Credits: 3)

This course focuses on the typical stages that successful start-up companies go through, tailored to the Armenian business reality. Students will apply appropriate managerial and entrepreneurial principles and frameworks to analyze innovative business ideas. Guest speakers from prominent Armenian start-up companies will share their experience on managing the initial phase of launching and developing a company, and on real-life “underwater stones” that they had to cope with. A major component will be a group project to identify “market gaps” that could be filled in by new product/service offerings, and to prepare a substantiating written report and a PPT presentation to support the case using analytical tools and techniques included in class materials. Classroom discussion and homework assignments will be based on case studies. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS101  BUS211   

 

BUS 288 Business Analytics (Credits: 3)

This course will introduce the main concepts in business analytics, which will allow achieving fluency in four paradigms that account for most business decisions: marketing, operations, human resources and financial analytics. Students will learn how to explore and visualize the data and develop an analytic mindset that will help you make strategic decisions based on data. Students also explore the common pitfalls in interpreting statistical arguments, especially those associated with big data. Collectively, this course will help students internalize a core set of practical and effective methods and concepts, and apply them to solve some real world problems. In the final Project, students will apply their skills to interpret a real-world data set and make appropriate business strategy recommendations. In addition to the readings, there are 5 graded problem sets and ungraded review problem sets at the beginning and end of the course. The problem sets have both analytical and computational exercise components. The statistical analysis will be conducted using IBM SPSS Statistics, IBM SPSS Modeler and MS Excel. Three hour instructor led class-time weekly.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS109 or CS100  BUS110 or IESM106 or CS107 or CS108   

 

BUS 292 Internship (Credits: 3)

The Business Internship provides students with practical experience in professional settings, enabling students to apply the skills learned throughout the program.   Placements must be approved by the Department Head. Approval will depend on both the suitability of the placement and the specific tasks and projects that the placement will entail. All internships require the writing of a report summarizing the internship experience.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

BUS 299 Capstone (Credits: 3)

As the culminating experience for the BA in Business degree, the Capstone course provides a transitional experience bridging concepts and skills introduced in prior courses and business practices in real world situations.  In teams, students will draw upon their knowledge across the functional areas of business in order to analyze entrepreneurial opportunities and develop an innovative and viable business venture.  Throughout the course, the teams will work to develop a written business plan and strategy for their venture under the mentorship of their advising instructor.  During instructor-led weekly class meetings, students will review key components of business plans and have the opportunity to act as business consultants to their peers as they discuss, analyze, and support the development of one another’s capstone projects. At the end of the course student teams will present their projects to faculty and peers and often to business leaders and knowledgeable professionals.  Students’ grades will be based upon the quality of the oral presentation and written business plan, proficiency in each of the functional areas of business, ability to make strategic and socially responsible business decisions, and competence working both independently and collaboratively. Home tasks will include completion of reading assignments and weekly progress on their capstone project. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS105  BUS160  BUS230 

 

BUS 300 Introduction to Competitive Strategy (Credits: 2)

This course is intended to develop students’ ability to think strategically about business problems. At the same time it serves as an introduction to the use of the case method. The course is a systematic examination of models and techniques used to analyze a competitive situation within an industry from a strategic perspective. It examines the roles of key players in competitive situations and the fundamentals of analytical and factoriented strategic reasoning. Examples of applied competitive and industry analysis are emphasized. The course examines the different stages involved in making and implementing strategic decisions,  defining the problem(s), establishing the criteria (both quantitative and qualitative), designing alternative solutions, and making a decision based on objective criteria and the ease of successful implementation of the solution chosen.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

BUS 301 Effective Communications (Credits: 2)

This course prepares students to meet the challenge of professional oral communications. Through prepared and impromptu speeches, peer coaching, and lectures, it provides students with the opportunity to develop the necessary skills for effective public speaking; skills that will make them articulate, confident, organized, competent and persuasive speakers. The course exposes students to a variety of communication and presentation styles and modes, helps students develop critical listening skills, and improve their abilities to give, receive, and apply feedback.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

BUS 305 Managing People and Organizations (Credits: 3)

This course provides an intensive overview of the major concepts in organizational behavior and issues facing contemporary managers. The course approaches management as the processes and techniques used to reach organization goals by working with and through people and other resources. These processes include a study of individual differences,  group behavior,  organizational culture,  job design and job satisfaction,  motivation,  decisionmaking,  power and leadership,  and communication. The course makes use of theories that transcend the workplace, such as the psychology of individual and group behavior. The course examines how people influence organizational events and how events within the organization influence people’s behavior. The course uses a combination of conceptual and experiential approaches, including case analyses, videos, simulations, group exercises and class discussions.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

BUS 306 Managerial Negotiations (Credits: 2)

This course introduces students to negotiation skills and practices and improves their abilities to diagnose conflict situations. It provides a conceptual framework to diagnose problems and promote agreements, both outside and inside an organization. Upon completion of this course, students will have a sound understanding of using negotiation and conflict resolution skills in a variety of settings. Course format involves simulated negotiation and experiential exercises, case analysis, discussion, and lecture.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS305     

 

 

BUS 307 Human Resource Management (Credits: 3)

The objective of this course is to introduce the student to a general overview of personnel policies and best practices in organizations. The course will focus on human resources from the perspective of the human resource professional. Specific topics to be covered include staffing, training and development, performance evaluation, compensation, employee discipline, work safety/health, and labor/management relations to name a few. This course will rely heavily on case analysis, along with didactic lectures, group discussions, and presentations.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS305     

 

BUS 308 Career Development and Strategies (Credits: 1)

Drawing upon human resources management and organizational studies and using case studies, this course examines how career paths and systems operate within an organization given the need for coherence between them and the strategy of the organization. The course also introduces students to several skills, tools and techniques required for effective career planning and advancement. The course provides students with the opportunity to practice and improve themselves in the following areas: identifying career goals and paths,  dealing with gaps in their critical career and professional skills,  professional networking and liaising. Students also examine the challenges and opportunities associated with the application of knowledge and skills learned in the program to their current/future work environments.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS305 

 

BUS 309 Special Topics in Management (Credits: 1-3)

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to some of the emerging global trends in management. The course covers concepts and practice not covered by other management courses. The focus will be on areas that are likely to have wide applicability in Armenia and in the region. The primary method of instruction will be to use didactic lectures, case analysis and group presentations.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS305     

 

BUS 310 International Business Management (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to fundamental as well as current major topics in international business by focusing on the economic, cultural, social, political and organizational issues raised by the international operations of the firm. The course explores the firm’s motivations for international expansion, its choices of entering foreign markets, and examines the key components involved in operating facilities, strategic positioning and organizational structure in foreign markets. The course also covers the fundamental elements of cross-cultural management and working in an international context by examining the impact of cultural differences in key management activities. The course places a special emphasis on exploring the challenges and opportunities facing Armenian firms in their expansion into the Russian, European and other markets as well as the strategic and operational challenges and opportunities facing multinational firms in the South Caucasus and in the Armenian market, in particular.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

BUS 311 Entrepreneurship (Credits: 3)

The course is designed to explore the complexities of creating and sustaining an entrepreneurial venture. Concentration is on the impact of innovative behavior and its implication to decision-making. The primary focus of the course is on the behaviors involved in forming new enterprises: recognizing and evaluating opportunities; developing a network of support; building an organization; acquiring resources; identifying customers; estimating demand; selling, writing and presenting a business plan; and exploring the ethical issues entrepreneurs face. The course format includes case studies and discussion, in-class exercises, readings, and guest speakers.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:       

 

BUS 312 Legal Environment of Business (Credits: 2)

This course provides students with a basic understanding of how legal, regulatory and political processes affect business strategy and decision making. Readings and lectures provide students with a basic background in the theoretical foundations and practical workings of the two main legal systems of the world, how they evolved and presently work. The course includes a survey of basic rules of criminal law, intentional torts, and negligence; the rules affecting the making and performance of contracts; general contract law as well as specific rules that exist in the sale of goods and merchandise, and in the purchase, ownership and sale of real property; and the choices available for dispute resolution, including mediation, arbitration, and trial at court.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

BUS 313 Corporate Ethics and Responsibility (Credits: 2)

This course examines contemporary issues in ethical behavior in organizations. Drawing from the fields of philosophy, law, ethics, business and society, and management, the course explores decision dilemmas that require multidisciplinary thinking as it pertains to corporate ethics and responsibility in today’s global marketplace. Emphasis is to practice decision principles that allow students to take into account their own moral principles in making business decisions. This course is taught drawing heavily on the case method along with didactic lectures, group discussions, and group presentations.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS305     

 

BUS 314 Leading Organizational Change (Credits: 3)

This course provides students with a broad understanding of the theoretical and operational underpinnings of management of change and corporate renewal in four domains: developing a strategic vision, designing new structures and processes, aligning individual motivation with organizational culture, and gaining support for the implementation of change. The course examines the impact of power and influence on decision-making, the politics of change, participative change approaches, reengineering, and organizational adaptation. The course relies heavily on case analysis, along with didactic lectures, group discussions, and presentations.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

BUS 315 International Strategic Management (Credits: 3)

This course provides an opportunity for students to integrate concepts from prior functional courses through the development and implementation of a business strategy. The course format involves lectures, class discussion, comprehensive case studies and an intensive business strategy simulation. The latter requires student teams to formulate and implement strategy for a simulated firm within a highly competitive industry. The course is designed to deepen students understanding of strategy formulation, competitive advantage, rivalry and competition, negotiation, financial control, operational excellence, and team building.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS345  BUS360  BUS300 

 

BUS 316 Organizational Leadership (Credits: 2-3)

This course will focus on an overview of the fundamental concepts of leadership in today’s global marketplace. The course will serve as an introduction to tools for topics such as strategic thinking, leading change and performance, critical thinking, leading teams and groups, influencing others, conflict resolution and Emotional Intelligence to name a few. The method of instruction for this course will combine didactic lectures, self-assessments, case analysis and group interactions.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS305     

 

BUS 318 Corporate Strategy (Credits: 3)

The main purpose of the course is to learn skills as a chief strategist of a firm with global and diverse outlook. The course will teach how a good strategist can size up the external environment of a firm in its entirety. Also, the course will concentrate on a firm’s internal activities and assets aimed at attaining a competitive advantage in an external environment.  The third distinctive dimension of the course is to learn how to sustain the advantage of a company over time in the face of competitive dynamics. Students’ evaluations include class participation, group presentation and the final exam.   Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS300     

 

BUS 319 Special Topics in Leadership (Credits: 2)

This course is designed to provide an in-depth examination of contemporary issues in organizational leadership. It is customized for students aspiring to acquire the necessary leadership skills and attributes to successfully compete in leadership roles in today’s global marketplace. Emphasis will be on helping each student become an ethical, effective, and empowered leader while inspiring excellence. The primary teaching method for this course will be case analysis, leadership training and experiential exercises.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

BUS 320 Data Analysis for Business Decisions (Credits: 3)

This course is an introduction to statistical methods and techniques as tools for management decision-making. Specific topics to be covered include: sampling and sampling distributions, parametric and non-parametric statistical inference methods, simple and multiple regression, and forecasting techniques as applied to business and management problems.  Students will gain the ability to build forecasting models using a variety of techniques, employing mathematical and statistical models including regression techniques, time series analysis, and business and economic indicators for forecasting. Students will also learn to use various computer software including Excel, SPSS and Access.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

BUS 321 Data Mining for Business (Credits: 3)

We will examine how data analysis technologies can be used to improve decision making. We will study the fundamental principles and techniques of data mining, and we analyze real-world examples and cases to place data-mining techniques in context and to develop data-analytic thinking. We will work “hands-on” with data mining software. As an applied course, the emphasis will be less on the inner working of each method and more on when and how to use each technique and how to interpret results. Students will be graded based on project presentations, homework assignments, midterm and end-term exams. There are three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS320     

 

BUS 322 Managerial Economics (Credits: 3)

This course focuses on the economic decisions made by managers of business firms, and the structures of various market environments within which these decisions are made. The course reviews the application of fundamental concepts, such as opportunity costs, transaction costs and market power as they apply to managerial and individual decisionmaking.  In addition, the course covers utility analysis,  demand, supply, and cost functions,  and applies these models to pricing and vertical integration issues.  An introduction to the economics of information and uncertainty is included.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

BUS 324 Business Analytics (Credits: 2)

This is a course on the use of decision models for business analytics. Its main topics include constrained optimization and decision making under uncertainty. The emphasis is on models that are widely used in diverse industries and functional areas, including operations, finance, accounting, and marketing. The course has a twofold purpose. First, it seeks to introduce you to simple models and ideas that provide useful (and often surprising) qualitative insights about a large spectrum of managerial problems. Second, it aims to give you a feeling for the kinds of problems that can be tackled quantitatively, the methods and software available for doing so, and some of the issues involved in gathering the relevant data. Whether or not students explicitly use these decision models in the future, the course will have impact on the way they think about available data and how it can be used to provide more value in management decisions.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

BUS 327 Microfoundations of Competitiveness (Credits: 3)

The course explores the determinants of national and regional competitiveness building from the perspective of firms, clusters, sub-national units, nations, and groups of neighboring countries.  It focuses on the sources of national or regional productivity, which are rooted in the strategies and operating practices of locally based firms, the vitality of clusters, and the quality of the business environment in which competition takes place.  Through lectures, class discussions and group projects, students will analyze competitiveness at multiple levels – nations, sub-national units and neighboring countries.   Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS300     

 

BUS 328 Economic Policy for Development and Competitiveness (Credits: 2)

The course combines a macroeconomic view of development and competitiveness and a microeconomic or business-level view. The macroeconomic analysis provides a contextual background for the discussions on the evaluation of business opportunities. Particularly, the course focuses on public policy as a basic element for ensuring national and industry-level competitiveness. The course draws on economic development theory and refers to specific cases, as well as business cases to examine the challenges of equitable economic growth; reviews the role of technology, innovation, public-private partnerships, and entrepreneurship in promoting sustainable economic development; and analyzes public policies affecting poverty and inequality. A substantial part of the analysis is conducted in the Armenian economy context.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS300     

 

BUS 329 Special Topics in Economics (Credits: 2-3)

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to some of the emerging global trends in Economics. The course covers concepts and practice not covered by other Economics courses. The focus will be on areas that are likely to have wide applicability in Armenia and in the region.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

BUS 330 Financial Management (Credits: 3)

This course focuses on the firm’s goal to maximize shareholder value. Topics include risk, return and pricing of financial assets, time value of money, investment decisions, capital markets, and cost of capital and corporate financing decisions.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

BUS 331 Data, Analysis and Decisions (Credits: 3)

This course reviews a range of econometric methods that can be used for supporting business and management. Starting with an introduction to  business and management decisions that need data analysis, the course will proceed to advanced econometric methods for addressing specific problems  stemming either from the nature of the data generation process or from the relationships being examined. The course will develop econometric skills in several ways. First, the course will review numerous econometric models and in each case discuss the type of problems the model is suited for, how to test hypotheses, and the shortcomings of various models. Second, students will be asked to prepare 2 presentations that will introduce a specific problem that a decision maker (manager) is facing (can face) and provide recommendations based on available data and econometric analysis. Third, to assist in the development of data management, modeling, analysis, and interpretative skills, students will use Stata to analyze data. Students will be graded based on group and individual presentations, midterm exam, final report, and class participation. This is a 3 unit elective course, with three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS320  ECON310   

 

BUS 332 Corporate Finance (Credits: 3)

This course builds upon BUS 330 by examining advanced topics in corporate finance including dividend policy, mergers & acquisitions, cost of capital, capital budgeting and financial decision-making.  Course concepts are integrated into the standard theories of risk and return, valuation of assets, the role of financial markets, and market structure.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

BUS 333 Advanced Corporate Finance (Credits: 2)

This course builds upon BUS 332 by delving deeper into the theory behind capital budgeting and valuation theory to examine new techniques for making these decisions, such as using option pricing models to make a capital budgeting decision, instead of the traditional net present value. The course covers mergers, leveraged buy-outs, divestitures and financial distress, along with the financial management of non-profit businesses. Additionally, the course examines in some detail the capital structure decision in terms of hybrid financing, and the most current instruments available for long funding of a corporation.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS332     

 

BUS 334 Commercial Banking (Credits: 2)

This course involves the study of modern commercial bank management, reasons for regulation; economics of banking, risk management including credit and interest rate risk, standards of liquidity, capital and solvency and recent changes in the modern commercial bank environment.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS332     

 

BUS 335 Banking Operations and Simulations (Credits: 3)

This course offers students a chance to take the theoretical underpinnings of commercial bank management and macroeconomics and apply it directly to operating a bank in a simulated environment. The Stanford Bank Computer Simulation will be enlisted to afford students an opportunity to simulate the managing of a large, metropolitan bank. Based on the economic data provided, students will need to forecast the direction of interest rates, set rates for loans and deposits, set fees for services, open or close branches, allocate the time of the bank’s officers, and make other equally critical, logistical decisions that are in fact made every day by professional bank practitioners. The course will probe in great detail how bank profitability and value are impacted by operational decisions.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS332     

 

BUS 336 Management of Financial Institutions (Credits: 3)

This course focuses on the study of financial policies and practices of commercial banks, savings and loan associations, pension funds, insurance companies, and other major financial institutions. It will review the current major problems facing senior managers in these financial institutions.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

BUS 337 Risk Management (Credits: 2)

This course provides a broad-based survey of the fundamental risks faced by financial institutions and other firms. These include interest rate risk, market risk, credit risk, off-balance sheet risk, technology and operational risk, foreign exchange risk, energy risk, country of sovereign risk, liquidity risk, insolvency risk, model risk, and a myriad of others. Effective management of these risks is central to the performance of any firm. The course explores the various techniques used to identify risk, measure risk, and manage risk. The knowledge gained in basic finance, portfolio management, derivatives, business management, economics, and statistics will be made practical.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS332     

 

BUS 338 Investment Analysis and Management (Credits: 3)

This course will address theory and practice of investment analysis. Topics include organization of security markets, legal and institutional environment, financial intermediation, security classification and general principles of asset valuation with application to specific securities.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: 

 

BUS 339 Special Topics in Finance (Credits: 2-3)

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to some of the emerging global trends in Finance. The course covers concepts and practice not covered by other Finance courses. The focus will be on areas that are likely to have wide applicability in Armenia and in the region.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

BUS 340 International Financial Management (Credits: 2)

This course approaches financial management within an international context. Topics include international monetary system and financial markets, management of foreign investments, financing for development, foreign exchange markets and risks, international diversification, and global funds.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS332     

 

BUS 345 Financial Accounting (Credits: 3)

This is a foundation course designed to provide a basic understanding of the theory and practice of accounting, with emphasis upon principles, concepts and controls involved with Financial Accounting. The objective of financial accounting is to collect accurate, systematic, and timely financial data and other financial information, and to compile and consolidate it in an organized and systematic way, according to the principles and rules of accounting, for external reporting purpose.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

BUS 346 Managerial Accounting and Control (Credits: 3)

Managerial Accounting is the process of identifying, measuring, analyzing and communicating financial information needed by management to plan, evaluate and control an organization’s operations. In this course  students understand the role of a management accountant in organizations;  identify relevant and irrelevant revenues and costs;  understand cost-volume-profit analyses;  calculate and interpret product costs, construct income statements and identify inventory balances,  understand the budget process and responsibility accounting,  and understand standard cost systems and production cost variances.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS345     

 

BUS 348 Financial Statement Analysis (Credits: 3)

This course provides a framework for using financial statements in business analyses. Emphasis is placed on understanding business as a financial system where management makes decisions in three key areas: investment, financing and operations. The course will outline the main financial statements used in the decision-making process and the main profitability and risk ratios used in comparing/assessing companies across different sizes and industries. The course will also include studying the main accounting principles used for compiling financial statements and analyzing qualitative information appearing in the financial statements and, finally, the role of financial Information in Valuation.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

BUS 350 Taxation and Business Decisions (Credits: 2)

Taxation related issues are also studied in another required course, Economic policy for development and competitiveness, and, in order to provide a richer set of choices for students in specialization, we propose the above change. Topics in this course are specific to the Armenian and global taxation, and, given that students acquire general and self-content knowledge in the above mentioned required course, students are better to self-select whether they want to further study peculiarities of taxation.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS346     

 

BUS 351 Cost Accounting (Credits: 2)

Intense competition in product markets has forced firms to look inward to become more cost-efficient. Tracing various resource costs accurately to products has become increasingly important as product margins are squeezed. Through a number of case studies supplemented by some lectures, this course exposes students to recent advances in cost accounting, and highlights important inputs into the design of cost systems. The cases cover a variety of decision-making settings and illustrate the role of cost information in these settings. Specific topics to be covered include the important characteristics of good costing systems, various cost allocation systems, reporting and the control of scrap/spoilage/rework products, accounting controls for production activities and for decentralized operations, including transfer pricing, customers profitability analysis, sales mix variances and performance measurement, and capital budgeting.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS346 

 

BUS 352 Armenian Taxation (Credits: 2)

This course focuses on all relevant Armenian Tax issues. Emphasis will be placed on taxes impacting business activities including: profits tax, income tax, VAT, excise tax, property tax, and tax administration. This course has a strong practical element in that students will be required to prepare various types of tax computations and offer advice on tax planning. Comparisons will also be made to tax regimes in developed market economies.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

BUS 353 Auditing and Evaluation Controls (Credits: 3)

The focus of this course is on independent auditors’ examinations of accounting information systems and related internal controls and evidential matter as a basis for expressing an opinion on financial statements. In this course students will develop a sound understanding of auditing theory and concepts. The rationale and objectives of specific auditing techniques will be emphasized. The focus will be on helping students develop analytical and critical thinking skills. It will also cover professional ethics, internal controls, and International Standards of Auditing.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS346  

 

BUS 355 Advanced Financial Accounting (Credits: 3)

The objective of this course is to introduce students to the advanced topics such as Business Combinations, Consolidations, Accounting for Multinational Enterprises, Partnership, Governmental Accounting and Accounting for Nonprofit Organizations. At the completion of this course, the student will be able to apply the equity method to accounting for investments; understand the difference between pooling of interest and purchase methods of accounting for investment; prepare consolidated financial statements; prepare and discuss segment reporting; explain the accounting issues, presentation and alternatives relating to foreign current transactions and translations; and explain how governmental and nonprofit accounting differs from for-profit accounting.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS345     

 

BUS 357 International Accounting (Credits: 2)

This course examines the international dimension of financial reporting and analysis. It provides students with an in-depth look at the multinational enterprise and the preparation and presentation of financial statements in different nations. Topics covered include international corporate taxation, transfer pricing, foreign currency translation, financial disclosure, and international accounting harmonization.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS346     

 

BUS 359 Special Topics in Accounting (Credits: 2-3)

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to some of the emerging global trends in Accounting. The course covers concepts and practice not covered by other Accounting courses. The focus will be on areas that are likely to have wide applicability in Armenia and in the region.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

BUS 360 Marketing Management (Credits: 3)

This course is an introduction to the role of marketing within the business firm. Quantitative methods and behavioral theories are utilized. It provides the student an opportunity to apply analytical concepts and techniques developed in psychology, economics, quantitative analysis, accounting, and finance to marketing problems. The course will utilize case studies, and oral and written presentations. Specific topics to be covered include: customer analysis and buyer behavior, market segmentation, market research, distribution channels, product pricing and strategy, pricing, advertising, and sales force management.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

BUS 362 Services Marketing (Credits: 2)

Services marketing is intended to broaden the understanding of how marketing is practiced in the service industry. The course will apply the principles of service marketing to organizations in the private, non-profit and public sectors. Service Marketing is designed to help individuals understand the critical elements in the development of customer satisfaction and service quality in today’s competitive business world.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS360     

 

BUS 364 International Marketing (Credits: 2)

The international arena is a requirement for any firm that wishes to achieve its maximum growth potential. The main objectives of this course are to present the main approaches to international marketing (from export to global marketing), help students to tackle strategic marketing problems facing international companies, and familiarize students with tools and techniques required in a complex and ever changing environment.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS360

 

BUS 365 Marketing Research (Credits: 3)

The objective of this course is to examine marketing research as an information providing activity for the purpose of management decision-making. Students will acquire the skills to examine alternative research designs and their relative strengths and weaknesses; to develop the meaning of measurement and scaling and their application in marketing research; to have a general understanding of the process of obtaining information by surveys of respondents, and to discuss the analysis of data obtained through marketing research Upon successful completion of this course, the students will understand how to develop a research proposal, compose questionnaires, and conduct market data analysis.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS320  BUS360   

 

BUS 366 Advertising Management (Credits: 3)

This course is designed to give students the basic understanding of advertising principles and practices. Methods used and effectiveness of various types of advertising will be analyzed. Because our environment has grown increasingly complex and technology is rapidly changing, it is essential that students understand the role played by advertising in our society and the advertising consequences: every principle and practice that stimulates the purchase act.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS360     

 

BUS 369 Special Topics in Marketing (Credits: 1-3)

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to some of the emerging global trends in marketing and advertising. The subjects of Armenian market trends are investigated, as well as, global technology and developments which then are applied to the country’s transitional business techniques. Different topics will be covered.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

BUS 370 Strategic Marketing (Credits: 2)

It is an integrative course designed to provide an executive perspective of strategy. This course focuses on making and analyzing complex decisions to describe the firm’s 38 strategies for long-term survival and growth in competitive markets. Techniques for analysis of environmental conditions and trends, opportunities and threats, and resource strengths and limitations are examined. The primary method of instruction will be case analysis.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS360     

 

BUS 372 Measurement Issues in Marketing (Credits: 2)

The objective of this course is to acquaint student will the application of various multivariate techniques to specific marketing problem areas. Students will learn how to apply factor analysis, discriminant analysis, cluster analysis, multidimensional scaling, and conjoint analysis to develop segmentation, product development, pricing and advertising models.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS320  BUS360   

 

BUS 373 Innovation Marketing (Credits: 2)

Students will learn about the wisdom acquired over many years regarding the managerial practice in new product development, innovation management, and launching of new products in the market. By the end of the course students are expected to be learn about the innovation process, how to create a successful innovation, the process of design and marketing new products, how to bring an existing product, service or technology into the market, and how state of the art innovation analytic methods can reduce risks and improve the possibilities of market success.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS360     

 

BUS 375 Competition Law (Credits: 3)

This course studies the relevant markets from the competition law perspectives. It Identifies and describes the ways by which IPR violations and enforcement may constitute anti-competitive practices and  explains the limits on commercial communications in terms of misleading and discrediting.  The course describes main types of regulation of unilateral and collective anti-competitive practices, mergers and acquisitions, as well as explains key challenges of anti-trust enforcement (including cross-border situations).  The course will explore the rationale behind each land-mark case of the EU and US antitrust law and highlight the differences of regulation in the EU and US regimes.  Student will learn about anti-trust regulations and enforcement practices, aimed at increasing competitiveness without engaging in anti-competitive conduct.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

BUS 380 Operations and Process Management (Credits: 2-3)

The focus of this course will be on the quantitative aspects of the elements, which contribute to the effective and efficient operations of an enterprise. Emphasis will be equally placed on the means for attaining organizational objectives for both service and manufacturing oriented entities. Topical areas will be the planning for and management of services and/or products, the design of processes, facility location and layout, forecasting, scheduling, and quality control.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

BUS 381 Management of Information Resources (Credits: 2)

This course is designed to make the students knowledgeable about the fundamentals underlying the design, implementation, control, evaluation, and strategic use of modern, computer-based information systems for business data processing, office automation, information reporting, and decision-making.  The course focuses on using and managing information technologies to derive business value and to secure a competitive advantage.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

BUS 382 Supply Chain Management (Credits: 2)

This course focuses upon the strategic impor­tance of supply chain management. The purpose of the course is to design and manage business- to-business to retail supply chain purchasing and distribution systems, and to formulate an inte­grated supply chain strategy that is supportive of various corporate strategies. New purchasing and distribution opportunities for businesses and inter/intra company communications systems designed for creating a more efficient marketplace are explored.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

BUS 384 Digital Commerce (Credits: 2)

This course covers e-commerce applications, methodologies, and services that address business solutions needed for electronic procurement, supplier management, and customer relationship management.  Real-life examples and case studies are examined to provide the student with working knowledge of constructing an E-Business, Business and Revenue Models, E-Marketplaces, Internet auctions, Internet and Web Programming, Legal Issues and E-Commerce /Digital Commerce strategy.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

BUS 385 Project Management (Credits: 2)

In this course students learn project management skills that are essential for current or future managers regardless of their career concentration. Some of the topics covered include life cycle models; project selection; project monitoring and control; planning with uncertainty; managing scope, risk, quality, time and costs; procurement; human resources and communications; the critical chain method; and managing multiple projects. It also discusses commercial project management software and how to overcome its limited functionality to address the requirements of managing risky, complex projects in practice.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS345     

 

BUS 388 Managing Companies at the Base of the Pyramid (Credits: 2)

This is a General Management course aimed at graduate students – potential entrepreneurs, managers and executives – who are interested in exploring new market-based approaches to poverty alleviation and addressing the needs of marginalized part of the population, especially in developing countries such as Armenia. The course integrates concepts of non-profit management, microfinance, inclusive growth and international business to stimulate the analytical thinking and leadership skills necessary for launching and managing Base-of- the-Pyramid (BoP) ventures. Through combination of lectures, international and local case studies, readings, videos and guest sessions, the course will engage students in discussions aimed at: 1) identifying the opportunities related to innovative perspectives on serving BoP markets; and 2) developing the strategies, business models, managerial practices and partnerships required to productively explore those opportunities. 2 hours of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

BUS 389 Experimental and Survey Design (Credits: 2-3)

This course will provide the students with strong background in experimental and survey design through structured lectures and classroom discussions. Given the latest developments in behavioral sciences, the course will also illustrate how behavioral/experimental methods can be applied to understand the decisions of individuals in such aspects as savings, tax compliance, investments and the like. Third the course will also tackle how experimental/behavioral methods can be used to study aspects of organizational structure and economic performance. Students will be evaluated based on 1) individual and group participation in the class, 2) individual written critique on the papers assigned as home reading and the discussion of the critique in the classroom, 3) a designed survey or experiment based on a research question agreed with the instructor.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

BUS 390 Entrepreneurship, Innovation & Incubation (Credits: 4)

The purpose of this integrative practicum is to understand how new business opportunities are identified and commercialized. The course structure follows the evolutionary process of a new venture: Idea assessment, organization formation, capitalization, growth, and exit. The course integrates much of what students have learned in their first year courses and challenges them to apply the newly acquired knowledge and tools to a real business situation. The course combines theoretical and applied learning, including lectures, guest speakers, traditional case studies and “live” new venture projects. Under the guidance of the faculty and with the support of mentors, student teams take a multi-disciplinary approach to the preparation and presentation of a business plan for a real new venture. In the process, students are expected to make difficult business choices with less than perfect information, dealing with ambiguity and uncertainty. Students conclude their project with an oral presentation in addition to a full written report.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

BUS 391 Startups: science and practice (Credits: 3)

This course aims to provide the necessary skillset for establishing and running a successful modern startup. It focuses on best practices and covers the fundamentals, which can establish a base for executing all stages of startup creation, idea selection, measurement, product building, user acquisition, innovation management, execution, fundraising, and choosing an exit strategy. By the end of the course, students will be able to choose ideas to work on, form teams, incorporate, develop the product, fundraise and commercialize their ideas. The course structure is case-based.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

BUS 392 Strategic Project Consulting (Credits: 4)

The third-year integrative practicum combines theoretical and applied learning, including lectures, guest speakers, traditional case studies and “live” projects that requires student teams apply classroom learning to complex, real-world business challenges for partner organizations. Under the guidance of the faculty member(s) and with the support of mentors, student teams develop practical problem-solving and consulting skills while their partners – ranging from multinational corporations to local nonprofit organizations – benefit from the student’s experience and knowhow. Students are expected to integrate and apply the knowledge and tools acquired in the previous two years of MBA studies and in their professional career to a real business situation; enhance and develop their project management and consulting skills; and hone their leadership skills. Students conclude their project with an oral presentation in addition to a full written report.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS315     

 

BUS 393 MBA Internship (Credits: 0)

This is required for FTMBA students who lack at least two years of relevant fulltime or four years of relevant part-time work experience at the date of their admission to the program. The internship allows students to clarify their career goals, assess personal strengths and weaknesses in professional work environment, develop professional competencies, understand the culture and practice of particular profession, and improve their opportunities for future employment. Students work for at least 360 hours, under the guidance of an on-site supervisor, with small/medium size businesses, manufacturing companies, governmental agencies or non‐profit and/or service organizations in order to analyze and solve actual and current problems facing the organization. At te end of the internship, a performance evaluation is given by the hosting organization. Students present an updated resume and a short written report describing their experience to complete the Career Development Strategies course.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

BUS 395 Business Policy and Strategy (Credits: 4)

This FTMBA course provides an opportunity for students to cap and integrate concepts from prior functional courses through the development and implementation of a business strategy. The course is designed to deepen students understanding of strategy formulation, competitive advantage, rivalry and competition, negotiation, financial control, operational excellence, and team building. The course format involves lectures, class discussion, comprehensive case studies, an intensive business strategy simulation, and a consulting project. The strategy simulation requires multifunctional teams of students to formulate and implement strategy for a simulated firm within a highly competitive industry. The consulting project module challenges students with real-world problems faced by partner organizations in specific functional areas. Student teams, formed according to their selected MBA concentration tracks, work with the functional managers and senior executives at these organizations to develop applicable solutions. Students conclude their project with an oral presentation in addition to a full written report.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS345  BUS360  BUS300 

 

BUS 396 MBA Capstone (Credits: 4)

The MBA Capstone course provides an opportunity for students to cap and integrate concepts from prior functional courses through the development and implementation of business models. The course is designed to deepen students’ understanding of strategy formulation, competitive advantage, rivalry and competition, and strategy execution (negotiation, financial control, operational excellence, and team building).  Throughout the course, the teams will work to develop a written project under the mentorship of their advising instructor. During instructor-led 4 weekly class meetings (equals 1 credit), students will review key components of research methods. Afterwards, teams start working on their research project under the faculty supervision. At the end of the course, student teams will present their projects to faculty and peers and often to business leaders and knowledgeable professionals. Students’ grades will be based upon the quality of the oral presentation and written reports, proficiency in each of the functional areas of business, ability to make strategic and analytical decisions, and competence working both independently and collaboratively.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS345  BUS360  BUS300 

 

BUS 399 Independent Study (Credits: 1-3)

Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

ECON 101 Introduction to Economics (Credits: 3)

This course examines key concepts in both microeconomics and macroeconomics. The course explores individual consumer and industry behavior, supply and demand, market efficiency and equilibrium and the impact of government intervention. Students will also analyze the economy as a whole, especially issues related to output, unemployment, productivity, inflation, trade, and economic growth and development. Students will use these basic concepts to weigh different perspectives on monetary and fiscal policy and evaluate economic claims used in articles and newspapers, political campaigns, and debates. Home tasks will include reading assignments and problem sets. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

ECON 120 Evolution of Economic Thought (Credits: 3)

This course examines the development of economic theories, models, and schools of thought from the birth of market economies to the present. Topics include the historical, institutional, and social forces shaping economic thinking and public policy. The course emphasizes foundational issues such as the role of the state in the economy, the social and economic consequences of property, prices, money, production, trade and other defining attributes of contemporary society. Home tasks include reading, research, and case studies. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: ECON121     

 

ECON 121 Principles of Microeconomics (Credits: 3)

This course examines basic principles of microeconomics including core elements of supply and demand, opportunity cost, market equilibrium, elasticity, and income distribution. Students will use these basic principles to evaluate market efficiency and social welfare resulting from the interactions of consumers, firms, and government regulation and intervention. Students will learn to define these basic principles and appropriately apply them to analyze case studies and current economic problems. Students are required to complete weekly reading assignments and use appropriate software to solve problem sets. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

ECON 122 Principles of Macroeconomics (Credits: 3)

This course examines aggregate economic activity in relation to the level, stability, and growth of national income, consumption, employment, interest rates, and inflation as well as the impact of the global economy. The course emphasizes the role and impact of monetary and fiscal policy on domestic and international economic stability and growth. Students will learn to describe and apply basic principles of macroeconomics as well as analyze the impact of monetary and fiscal policy on aggregate national and international economics. Students are required to complete weekly reading assignments and use appropriate software to complete problem sets and case studies. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

ECON 221 Intermediate Microeconomics (Credits: 3)

The course examines the theories of utility and demand, production, cost functions in the short and long run general equilibrium analysis, and supply under differing market conditions of perfect competition and monopoly. Problems and applications are used to acquaint students with the implications of the theoretical concepts. Home tasks will include completion of reading assignments and problem sets. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS109 or CS100  ECON121   

 

ECON 222 Intermediate Macroeconomics (Credits: 3)

Building on topics introduced in ECON 122, Principles of Macroeconomics, this course covers topics including per capita income theories and comparisons across countries and time, fluctuations in output and employment, and the role of government in influencing aggregate variables. Home tasks include reading, research, and case study analysis. Three hour of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: ECON121        

        

ECON 223 Economics of Sustainable Development (Credits: 3)

This course examines the concepts and methods used to analyze the interactions among the economy, the environment and society. . Students will work individually and in groups to examine how markets can address environmental and societal problems and promote sustainable development. Home tasks include reading, research, and case analysis. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: ECON121     

 

ECON 224 Introduction to Econometrics (Credits: 3)

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to econometrics. Students will learn to apply relevant models and methods to estimate relationships between economic variables, test hypotheses, and solve economic problems using appropriate software. Topics include theoretic probability, random variables, single and multiple regression analysis, functional forms, omitted variable analysis, multicollinearity, heteroscedesticity, autocorrelation, simultaneous equations, and dynamic models. Home tasks will include completion of reading assignments and problem sets. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: CS100 OR BUS109  ECON121   

 

ECON 225 International Economics (Credits: 3)

This course examines globalization, international monetary issues, and international trade in a world of nation states and international and regional organizations. Students will explore theories and apply them to policy issues. Topics include foreign exchange markets, balance-of-payment adjustment, exchange rate theories, impediments to trade, financial crises, and monetary and fiscal policy in a global economy. Home tasks will include reading assignments and case study analysis. Three hour of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: BUS112     

 

ECON 228 Economics of Development (Credits: 3)

This course examines the evolving definition of economic development and the changing processes that support and hinder it. Students will be introduced to a range of development theories and will analyze how economic development is impacted by human capital (education, health and nutrition), income distribution, the rural and urban sectors, technology, investment, property rights and contracts, international migration and remittances, infrastructure. The course will also cover national and international policies and reforms, financial markets, foreign trade, foreign aid, and international institutions. Through this course, students will learn to measure economic development, analyze variables that contribute to or deter it, and develop evidence-based solutions to real-world economic challenges. Home tasks will include completion of reading assignments and case studies. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: ECON121  ECON122   

 

ECON 229 Special Topics in Economics (Credits: 3)

The objective of this specialized course is to equip students with applied analytical tools in economics of competition, as well as firm strategy and industrial organizations. The course will be composed of three distinct subsections. First it will provide some advanced game theoretic models of games of incomplete information (signaling games, Bayesian equilibrium, citizen-candidate models). Second part will deal with selected topics from theory of the firm and industrial organizations (Product differentiation, vertical and horizontal integration, spatial competition). Final section will refer to competition policy by analyzing important concept of natural monopoly in a more advanced setting and covering advanced models of market structure analysis and look at market collusion models in more details. Home tasks will include completion of reading assignments, research and case studies. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: ECON121  BUS112   

 

ECON 300 Quantitative Methods for Economists (Credits: 3)

This course is an introduction to mathematics used in economics. Students learn to apply mathematical tools and methods in order to design models in economic analysis and to be able to read, understand, analyze and apply to economic theories and problems. Topics include integral calculus, multivariate calculus, optimization theory, linear algebra (matrix algebra), implicit function theorem, difference and differential equations. Students are required to complete weekly reading assignments and solve problem sets. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite: ECON320
Prerequisite:      

 

ECON 310 Economic Statistics (Credits: 3)

This course provides students with a survey of statistical methodology. Topics include probability and sampling, distribution theory, hypothesis testing, estimation, analysis of variance, confidence intervals, and linear regression. Students are required to complete biweekly problem sets by solving exercises and using statistical software. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

ECON 311 Econometrics (Credits: 3)

Through this course, students learn to apply statistical methods to quantify economic relationships. Topics include econometric models, hypothesis testing, least squares, instrumental variables, panel data methods, and time series. Through lectures and weekly problem sets, students learn to use statistical software to test and estimate economic relationships and evaluate empirical economic research. Students apply what they learn to real data and write an empirical paper on a topic of interest. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: ECON300  ECON310   

 

ECON 315 Financial Econometrics and Time Series Analysis (Credits: 3)

This course is an introduction to data analysis and econometric modeling using applications in finance and time series. The course uses concepts from microeconomics, finance, mathematical optimization, data analysis, probability models, statistical analysis, and econometrics. The course will be 16 weeks long. Each week consists of one 150 minutes lecture. Finance topics include asset return calculations, risk and performance measures, portfolio theory, index models, and applied time series analysis. Quantitative methods involve basic matrix algebra. Statistical topics include probabilities, expectation, joint distributions, covariance, normal distribution, sampling distributions, estimation and hypothesis testing, data analysis, linear regression, time series methods and simulations. There will be weekly frequent homework assignments requiring STATA programming. Students will work independently and periodically in groups to complete problem sets and group projects. Students will be graded on quizzes/problem sets, midterm and final exams. The course qualifies for all MSE tracks.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: ECON310     

 

ECON 316 Topics in Applied Health Econometrics  (seminar) (Credits: 3)

This course reviews a range of econometric methods (such as Probit, Logit, Tobit, Poisson, Negative Binomial, LAD, Matching, GLM) that have been used for testing economic hypotheses in health outcomes. Starting with an introduction to health outcomes, the course will proceed to advanced econometric methods for addressing specific problems generated by either the nature of the data generation process or the economic relationships being examined. The course will develop your econometric skills in several ways. First, the course will review numerous econometric models and in each case discuss the type of problems the model is suited for, how to test hypotheses, and the shortcomings of various models. Second, you will be asked to prepare two presentations; first presentation will cover a particular method and second presentation will cover health condition related outcomes. Third, to assist in the development of your data management, modeling, computer, and interpretative skills, you will use Stata to analyze data. Students will be graded on quizzes/problem sets, midterm, project/presentation and final exams. The course qualifies for the MSE Applied Economics track.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: ECON310     

 

ECON 317 Data Scraping (Credits: 3)

This course will introduce the main methods of acquiring data from the web and other digital sources. Students will learn how to scrape, parse, and read web data as well as access data using web APIs (e.g. Twitter, LinkedIn etc.). They will work with HTML, JSON and other data formats in Python. They will also learn how to use a set of freely available tools to gather data from the web. The format of the course will be mainly case-based introducing the applications of data scraping in various aspects of business and economics. Student’s work will be evaluated based on class participation, quizzes/problem-sets, midterm and final project. The course qualifies for the MSE Applied Economics track.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: ECON310     

 

ECON 320 Microeconomic Theory (Credits: 3)

The course covers key topics in the modern microeconomic theory at an advanced graduate level. It focuses on the behavior of individual consumers and firms in making economic decisions and on how these decisions affect market outcomes. Topics include consumer and producer theory, decision making under uncertainty, general equilibrium and welfare properties, market equilibrium and market failure, perfect and imperfect competition. Throughout the course, students analyze various microeconomic problems and policy issues by completing weekly problem sets. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to employ quantitative techniques to model economic phenomena from the perspective of the individual agents.
Corequisite: ECON300
Prerequisite:      

 

ECON 327 Industrial Organizations (Credits: 3)

The course is designed to equip students with tools necessary to study complex market structures and firm behavior. It starts by covering main topics in game theory that are necessary to analyze strategic interactions of the firms in the markets. In particular students will master concepts of perfect and Bayesian equilibrium: the necessary building blocks of IO models. Theoretical models will address issues of static and dynamic price competitions, repeated interactions and tacit collusions, spatial and monopolistic competition, strategies of entry and accommodation. Students will also be introduced to firms’ competitive behavior under asymmetry of information. Empirical models will mainly deal with complex problem of demand estimation in industries.  Students will be provided with specific reference materials, but will be expected to read more advanced materials on some selected topics. Evaluations will be based on homeworks and exams, as well as they will be asked to read, analyze and present a seminal paper on IO and discuss it with their peers. This is a 3 credit hour course.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: ECON320  ECON330   

 

ECON 330 Macroeconomic Theory (Credits: 3)

The course covers key topics in the modern macroeconomic theory at an advanced graduate level. It focuses on models of medium- and long-run macroeconomic dynamics and their empirical implications. Topics include different models of economic growth, theories of aggregate fluctuations, macroeconomic policy and their implications. Throughout the course, students analyze various macroeconomic problems and policy issues by completing weekly problem sets. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to employ quantitative techniques to model economic phenomena from the macroeconomic perspective.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

ECON 331 Monetary Theory and Policy (Credits: 3)

The course focuses on monetary aspects of the business cycle. Using different theoretical models the course studies the goals of monetary policy, the choice of policy instruments, the rule-versus-discretion debate, central bank credibility and etc. Throughout the course students analyze various problems and policy issues by completing weekly problem sets. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to employ quantitative techniques to model monetary phenomena. Students will be graded on problem sets, midterm and final exams. This is a 3 credit hour course. The course qualifies for the MSE Monetary and Macroeconomic Policy track.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: ECON320  ECON330   

 

ECON 335 Monetary Policy and Financial Markets (Credits: 3)

The course covers topics in monetary policy and financial markets. It consists of two parts. The first part focuses on monetary aspects of the business cycle and covers different theoretical models of monetary policy, as well as relevant empirical evidence. The second part focuses on pricing of bonds, forward and futures contracts, risk measures, portfolio analysis and asset pricing models. During the course MatLab is used to simulate models and implement different methods. Throughout the course, students analyze various problems and policy issues by completing the weekly problem sets. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to employ quantitative techniques to model monetary and financial phenomena, as well as to study the impacts of implemented monetary policy. The course requires a solid background in mathematics. The course qualifies for the MSE Monetary and Macroeconomic Policy track.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: ECON300  ECON320  ECON330 

 

ECON 336 Macroeconomic Policy Seminar (Credits: 3)

The course explores 3 major areas of modern macro–economic policies including basic policy goals, instruments, policy design, applications and their consequences. First the most prominent types of monetary policy regimes will be discussed, such as Inflation Targeting under flexible exchange rate, which will be followed by discussion on various forms of monetary systems and exchange rate regimes. Second macro prudential and regulatory policies for maintaining financial stability will be investigated. The third topic of the course will be de devoted to fiscal policy. Finally the course will touch such topics as international policy coordination, supervision and coordination or tradeoffs among monetary and fiscal/macro prudential policies.

The primary focus will be both on advanced economies and emerging markets including Armenia. The prevention and management of various types of economic crises will be discussed. In particular the 2008 US crisis, ongoing Eurozone crisis, their spillovers onto emerging markets and recent CIS region crisis and currency depreciations will be analyzed. Students will be graded on class participation, midterm and final exams. This is a 3 credit hour course. The course qualifies for the MSE Monetary and Macroeconomic Policy track.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: ECON320  ECON330  ECON331 

 

 

ECON 340 International Trade (Credits: 3)

In this course we will study the main topics in the area of international trade and trade policy. Firstly, we refresh our knowledge in micro-foundations, intensively used throughout the course. Then we study the traditional trade theories and review the relevant empirical literature. In the second part of the course, we discuss trade policies such as tariffs, quotas and non-tariff barriers, as well as the key role of foreign direct investments and multinational firms in economic growth. Throughout the course, much time will be devoted to analyze empirical challenges in the discipline.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: ECON300  ECON310  ECON320 

 

ECON 350 Financial Economics (Credits: 3)

Much of modern financial economics works with models in which agents are rational and arbitrageurs can fix any mis-pricing. Behavioral Financial Economics is the area of finance which relaxes both of these assumptions. Behavioral models usually have two building blocks: limits to arbitrage, which make it difficult for rational traders to undo the dislocations caused by less rational traders; and psychology, which catalogues the kinds of deviations from full rationality we might expect to see. We discuss these two topics, and then consider a number of applications such as asset pricing (the aggregate stock market and the cross-section of average returns) or individual investor portfolio choice and trading behavior.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: ECON300  ECON320   

 

ECON 351 Finance Theory (Credits: 3)

This course covers modern finance theory and practice. The topics of the course include: 1) functions of financial markets and intermediaries; 2) analysis and valuation of traded securities; 3) portfolio management theory, tools for portfolio performance measurement and asset pricing models; 4) fixed-income securities; 5) introduction to derivatives and alternative investments; 6) SAA models and risk management tools; and 7) applications of economic analysis to portfolio management. Students will be graded on quizzes/problem sets, midterm and final exams. The course qualifies for the MSE Finance track.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

ECON 353 Economics of Corporate Finance (Credits: 3)

The objective of this course is to learn the economics behind financial tools that are used in financial decision making process. The course presents the economic insights of corporate finance theory and emphasizes the application of theory to real-life financial decisions. Several real business cases will be discussed during the course.  Student’s work will be evaluated based on class participation, quizzes/problem sets, midterm and final project. The course qualifies for the MSE Finance track.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

ECON 354 Asset Allocation and Multi-asset Investing (Credits: 3)

The course examines asset allocation and multi-asset investing from a practitioner’s perspective. It is intended to explore the strategies, themes, and formal building blocks that practicing asset allocators need to be proficient in. In addition to becoming familiar with the substance of a range of investment topics, students will be taught how to present research and investment results in a professional setting. Student’s work will be evaluated based on class participation, in-class quizzes/problem sets, midterm and final project. The course qualifies for the MSE Finance track.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:

Prerequisite: ECON315  ECON351

  

 

ECON 355 Financial Markets and Modeling (Credits: 3)

The course examines the composition of financial markets, the analysis and valuation of traded securities, portfolio management theory and tools for portfolio performance measurement. To increase the practical skills of the students, relevant software is used to develop different methods and financial models. Throughout the course students analyze various problems and policy issues by completing weekly problem sets. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to understand financial relationships, how financial markets operate and employ quantitative techniques to analyze and evaluate investment decisions. Students will be graded on problem sets, midterm and final exams. This is a 3 credit hour course.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: ECON320  ECON330   

 

ECON 360 Public Economics (Credits: 3)

This course examines the role of government in the economy, and how the market may fail to produce efficient or equitable outcomes. We consider policies that may correct for market failures, and challenges posed by politics and incomplete information. The course will have a strong theoretical angle. It also includes an overview of the federal, state, and local budgets, and takes both a contemporary and historical look at the role of government in providing defense, infrastructure, education, pensions, health care, unemployment insurance, and other services.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: ECON300  ECON320   

 

ECON 361 Sustainable Development (Credits: )

The purpose of this course is to develop general understanding of sustainable development (SD) and the way this paradigm is translated into policy-making. Three basic blocks of the concept are presented step by step: economic development, social change and conservation of environment. The course will begin with reviewing the current state of the planet, exploring the inception of the SD concept, and international efforts undertaken in the mainstream of this concept since early 70s. Then the focus will shift to economic policy and discuss economic growth vs. economic development. The course will then move to the issues of social change, particularly addressing poverty and hunger, income inequality, education and human capital as factors of SD. Next the instructor will turn to the issues of overpopulation, urbanization, scarcity of natural resources and impact of these factors on SD.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

ECON 380 Professional Internship (Credits: 3)

During Professional Internship the student is expected to gain experience and improve skills through appropriate developmental work assignments in a real business environment. Students must discuss specific learning objectives with the MSE program chair and internship coordinator at the beginning of the semester and receive approval of their plans in order to register and receive credits for the internship. The internship must be related to economics and finance, and require knowledge suitable for a master’s degree level. The total work load requirement is 8-10 hours per week for 15 weeks, which includes both hours at the workplace and hours needed to compete the research or analysis related to the work. At semester end, each student prepares a written paper reflecting on the work experience. Student performance is evaluated by the internship coordinator and program chair based on written report and report presentation. Depending on the internship type the course may qualify for MSE track credit, upon program chair approval.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: ECON300  ECON310  ECON320  ECON330  

         

ECON 385 Economic Research Seminar (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to economic research methods, prepares them to conduct independent research, and is essential for students’ capstone writing course.  Students will be exposed to an array of research designs and reports, which they analyze and critique as well as use to inform the development of their own research.  By mid-term, students prepare a formal proposal and presentation for their capstone research project, with the following components: 1) research question, 2) literature review, and 3) description of research methods. After receiving feedback from instructor and peers, students begin to collect and analyze their data.  By the end of the course, students will complete a written report and present their findings from the research collected and analyzed. This report and presentation will serve as the basis for students’ capstone projects.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: ECON300  ECON310  ECON311  ECON320  ECON330    

     

ECON 386 Capstone (Credits: 3)

As the culminating experience for the MS in Economics degree, the capstone course is a 3 credit writing course during which students write a report and deliver a presentation based on the research they began in the Economic Research Seminar course. Due to the individualized nature of capstone projects, students meet with their advisor to review the progress of their research and writing and receive guidance. At the end of the course students are required to produce and present to faculty and peers a research report (thesis) of publishable quality.
Corequisite: ECON385
Prerequisite:      

 

MGMT 300 Quantitative Tools for Management (Credits: 3)

This course provides an intensive introduction to core concepts in mathematics and statistics, and the main tools that necessary for quantitative analysis in decision-making process. Topics include optimization, financial mathematics, probability theory and data analysis. Materials are of depth and coverage necessary for efficient progress in subsequent courses of business analytics, finance, operations management and others. Students will utilize software such as MS Excel and SPSS to solve problems. This intensive course will be a combination of instructor led lectures and computer-lab sessions.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:    

 

MGMT 323 Business Strategy (Credits: 3)

In this course, students will develop the ability to think strategically about business problems by analyzing challenges in various industries with a focus on the roles of key players and the fundamentals of analytical and strategic reasoning.  Through case studies, students will examine the different stages involved in making and implementing strategic decisions: defining the problem(s), establishing the criteria (both quantitative and qualitative), designing alternative solutions, and making a decision based on objective criteria.  Examples of applied competitive and industry analysis are emphasized.  Instructor-led discussions with extensive use of case studies.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

MGMT 325 Business Analytics (Credits: 3)

Business analytics focuses on data-driven decision making in business.  Applications of business analytics can be utilized in operations, marketing, finance, human resource management among other functional areas of business.  In this course, students will examine selected cases to learn how to make reliable forecasting (predictive analytics), evaluate impact of certain decisions (prescriptive analytics), as well as solve optimization problems while exploring the challenges that can arise in implementing analytical approaches within an organization.  Instructor-led discussion and lab time based on designated cases, as well as applied home assignments.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: MGMT300     

 

MGMT 326 Managerial Finance (Credits: 3)

This course studies the effects of time and uncertainty on decision-making. Topics include discounted cash flow valuation, stock and bond valuation, the term structure of interest rates, capital budgeting, risk and return, dividend policy decisions, portfolio theory, asset pricing models and efficient markets. Instructor-led lectures and discussions with case studies.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

MGMT 341 Organizational Behavior (Credits: 3)

This course provides a thorough overview of the major concepts in organizational behavior and issues that (private) organizations face nowadays. The course approaches organizational behavior as human behavior in the workplace and studies aspects of human motivation, organizational culture and structure, team-work and decision-making, power and leadership, and communication. It also explores how individuals influence organizations and how organizations influence individual behavior at work. A combination of conceptual and experiential approaches, including case analyses, videos, diagnostic self-assessments, peer and group discussions are utilized throughout course.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite:      

 

MGMT 344 Accounting for Decision Making (Credits: 3)

This course examines managerial decision making using information for internal efficiency and application of evidence-based approach in the relationships with external environment. Students will analyze the complex relationships between accounting techniques and other organizational activities including incremental costs and benefits of an undertaking, optimal resource allocation, efficiency measurement and improvements, pricing strategy, working capital management, profitability management, costing techniques, etc. Instructor-led discussions are accompanied by extensive use of problem sets and complex cases.
Corequisite:
Prerequisite: